fycanadianpolitics:

queennubian:

locsgirl:

evayna:

HOW DID I NOT KNOW ALL THIS!?!?!?!

'Cause history involving black people is always erased, that's why.

Because a lot of us were taught that once you got to north you were free, but if you could get the Canada you were safe from being dragged back into slavery by hunters. It was like Canada was best place you could be if you were trying escape slavery (per US history classes)

Author and historian Afua Cooper has described slavery in the Great White North as “Canada’s best kept secret.” She says that between 1628 and 1833, Canada had approximately 8,000 slaves, but it’s a part of the country’s history that is not well known.

“Canada conveniently forgot its own history of slave-holding, because that would make the country look immoral, indecent,” says Cooper […]

Before the British conquest of 1760 when Canada was still a French colony, nearly 60 percent of slaves were aboriginal and 40 percent were of African descent, Cooper estimates. After Britain took over, the ratio of aboriginal slaves declined as the British brought in more slaves from Africa, the West Indies, and the Caribbean, as well as from its 13 American colonies. 

Slave-owners in the American South were largely plantation owners, but in Canada they ran the gamut, from merchants and fur traders to farmers and even religious institutions.

“The slave owners were everybody, in every social class,” says Cooper. “Members of the clergy owned large amounts of slaves.”

(via cognitivedissonance)

breakingnews:

Canada’s Supreme Court has struck down all of the country’s prostitution laws, including running a brothel and street solicitations, CP24 reports. The decision gives Parliament one year to respond with new legislation.

apihtawikosisan:

Really quick…the people of Elsipogtog are out setting up plaques and reclaiming ‘Crown’ lands. Canadians are confused and think the Mi’kmaq are trying to squat.

1. Those lands do not belong to Canada. They were never ceded, and the Supreme Court of Canada confirmed this in 1999.

2. Even with…

montrealmighteatitsyoung:

peuplesvisibles:

RCMP descends on Mi’kmaq-led anti-fracking blockade

"RCMP officers moved in early Thursday morning to enforce an injunction against a Mi’kmaq-led barricade that has trapped exploration vehicles belonging to a Houston-based firm conducting shale gas exploration in New Brunswick.
An eye-witness who left the barricade after police moved in said a Molotov cocktail was thrown and that some warriors claimed they were “willing to die” holding the line. The eye-witness also said the RCMP officers moved in with guns drawn.
Miles Howe, a journalist with Media Co-op, also said in a Facebook posting that Molotov cocktails had been thrown at police and that rubber bullets had been fired in the surrounding woods. (…)”

(APTN News - 17/10/2013)

"Elsipogtog councillor Robert Levi told the Canadian Press that RCMP officers have sprayed “dozens” of people with pepper spray.”
“The chief was manhandled a little bit and all hell broke loose,” said Levi.

montrealmighteatitsyoung:

peuplesvisibles:

RCMP descends on Mi’kmaq-led anti-fracking blockade

"RCMP officers moved in early Thursday morning to enforce an injunction against a Mi’kmaq-led barricade that has trapped exploration vehicles belonging to a Houston-based firm conducting shale gas exploration in New Brunswick.

An eye-witness who left the barricade after police moved in said a Molotov cocktail was thrown and that some warriors claimed they were “willing to die” holding the line. The eye-witness also said the RCMP officers moved in with guns drawn.

Miles Howe, a journalist with Media Co-op, also said in a Facebook posting that Molotov cocktails had been thrown at police and that rubber bullets had been fired in the surrounding woods. (…)”

(APTN News - 17/10/2013)

"Elsipogtog councillor Robert Levi told the Canadian Press that RCMP officers have sprayed “dozens” of people with pepper spray.”

“The chief was manhandled a little bit and all hell broke loose,” said Levi.

(via apihtawikosisan)

hey so about the protests in New Brunswick

jakke:

Basically what’s going on here is that Southwestern Energy (which owns pipelines and oil and gas extraction projects all over the US) is trying to search for natural gas in shale formations, which they’d likely end up extracting via fracking.

This has angered members of the Mi’kmaw Nation, on whose traditional land the exploration project lies. (The Nation is currently negotiating with the federal government for a comprehensive land-claims agreement with self-governance and so far has signed an “umbrella agreement” with the federal and provincial governments which basically lays out ground rules for eventual negotiations, but that’s nowhere near recognized by federal and provincial governments yet.). Other nearby residents are also not enthusiastic about the process, because of course local residents bear all the environmental costs of the extraction process while all the profits accrue to a nonlocal company.

Anyway, towards the end of September members of the Mi’kmaw Nation and like-minded settler types established a blockade to stop letting through natural gas exploration vehicles. At the beginning of October, Southwestern Energy obtained an injunction to get the protesters to leave. They declined to do so, because a big part of why they were protesting was civil disobedience against a government that has not yet recognized their claim to govern the land and underlying resource extraction projects.

At this point, the standoff between the protesters and the heavily-armed RCMP who were sent in to enforce the injunction has gotten pretty intense. Dozens of protesters have been arrested, the RCMP has apparently been using aggressively physical tactics, several RCMP vehicles have been set on fire, and media access is severely restricted. The CBC has a pretty detailed article, as does the independent pro-Indigenous Intercontinental Cry; their accounts of what’s happening are a little irreconcilable. Also ayiman has been reblogging lots of primary content on tumblr.

Not sure how this is going to end. Solidarity protests are being organized all over North America, but it seems pretty inevitable that the heavily-armed RCMP are going to be able to end the blockade soon. On a larger scale, it’s not clear how this can get translated into the kind of institutional change that would make future blockades unnecessary. Federal and provincial governments are composed of people who care about winning elections more than anything else, and in Canada there’s more sympathetic media coverage of the destruction of half a dozen (insured!) RCMP vehicles than First Nations land claims, so I don’t know what the trajectory would look like between here and changes to regulation for extractive industries or changes to the role of First Nations governments in land use policy. Practically speaking, though, active fracking would not only severely complicate future land claims processes but also quite likely irreversibly contaminate groundwater supplies. So there’s some pretty clear rationale for acting now, even if the probability of success is low.

It’s worth noting that Southwestern Energy stock hasn’t taken much of a hit and Seeking Alpha notes its low political risk. So apparently investors think there’s no realistic chance that the RCMP won’t be successful in enforcing the injunction, removing the blockade, and allowing Southwestern Energy to run hugely profitable natural-gas extraction while offloading the environmental damages on the residents.

"And of course, they hadn’t really thought of me as a person. Why should they? These images are throwaways, little bursts of amusement to get through a long workday. You look, you chuckle, you get some ridicule off your chest and move on to the next source of distraction. No one thought about the possibility that I might read those words. Far less, that I would talk back."

My embarrassing picture went viral, Caitlin Sedia, Salon

More of our viral photo subjects should rise up and revolt. Another recent example here. (via shortformblog)

I hope this article goes viral and makes a difference.

(via shortformblog)

"If you wouldn’t do it to a man, then stop it. It doesn’t matter what your motivations are. Stop it. Figure out why you expect women to perform unpaid emotional labor for you. Figure out what’s prompting you to try to control women’s emotions and behaviors and faces. Figure out why you think that’s ok. And then do what you need to do to change that about yourself so that you can be a better man. Do what you need to do to make the world a safer place. Because if you’re not making yourself part of the solution, you’re part of the problem and we don’t need that. Stop it."

— Dr. Charlie Glickman, on men telling women to smile. (via cleispress)

(via stfusexists)

I think this is the first time I ever lost followers because I started posting again.  Hmf.  

"When asked why they hassled women, most of the men responded that harassment alleviated boredom, was ‘“fun,” and gave them a feeling of camaraderie with other men; many added, defensively, that it didn’t hurt anybody. Some said it was intended as a compliment. Twenty percent said they would not engage in the behavior alone but only did so when they were in groups of men - a finding that supports a “male-bonding” explanation of harassment of demonstrating solidarity and mutual power. A minority, approximately fifteen percent, who were also the group that employed the most graphic commentary and threats, said explicitly that they intended to anger or humiliate their victims."

Street Harassment and the Informal Ghettoization of Women by Cynthia Grant Bowman in Harvard Law Review, January 1993

(via moniquill)

(Source: fauxcyborg, via stfufauxminists)

nationalpost:

Diane Francis: The merger of the century
In her new book, National Post columnist Diane Francis makes the case for the U.S. and Canada forming a united North America
The best option for the U.S. and Canada to survive the new economic reality would be to alter course by devising protective policies and to merge into one gigantic nation. 
If they merged, Canada and the U.S. would become an energy and economic powerhouse, occupying more land than Russia or the continent of South America, and equivalent to 12.25% of the world’s total landmass. Better yet, Canada is virtually empty, thus providing enormous development opportunities. The two could better tackle environmental challenges together through science and by replacing coal, the biggest culprit worldwide, with shared hydro, conservation and alternative energy sources. Combined, they would have a larger economy than the European Union or than the economies of Japan, China, Germany and France combined. The merged nations would control more oil, water, arable land and resources than any other and would enjoy the protection of America’s military. They would be able to eliminate trade and even government budget deficits, and would share a strengthened currency. The merged country’s people would have more options, too, in terms of jobs, climates, studies and lifestyles. More here
(Photo: Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press; Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

well this seems like a horrible idea.

nationalpost:

Diane Francis: The merger of the century

In her new book, National Post columnist Diane Francis makes the case for the U.S. and Canada forming a united North America

The best option for the U.S. and Canada to survive the new economic reality would be to alter course by devising protective policies and to merge into one gigantic nation. 

If they merged, Canada and the U.S. would become an energy and economic powerhouse, occupying more land than Russia or the continent of South America, and equivalent to 12.25% of the world’s total landmass. Better yet, Canada is virtually empty, thus providing enormous development opportunities. The two could better tackle environmental challenges together through science and by replacing coal, the biggest culprit worldwide, with shared hydro, conservation and alternative energy sources. Combined, they would have a larger economy than the European Union or than the economies of Japan, China, Germany and France combined. The merged nations would control more oil, water, arable land and resources than any other and would enjoy the protection of America’s military. They would be able to eliminate trade and even government budget deficits, and would share a strengthened currency. The merged country’s people would have more options, too, in terms of jobs, climates, studies and lifestyles. More here

(Photo: Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press; Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

well this seems like a horrible idea.